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Wednesday, October 28, 2009

My contribution to Open Access Week 2009

Open Access Yeah, I know it's a week late, but this is where it fits into our timetable. Over the next week, all 200 of our first year Biological Sciences students will take an awareness-raising quiz on copyright, creative commons and open access. This replaces an unpopular image processing session which we will run a different way this year. Thanks to my colleagues from the David Wilson Library and the people on FriendFeed who helped out with ideas and checking. Here's a taster of some of the questions:

A student is creating a public website for a medical charity and would like to include images from PLoS Medicine. The work is voluntary and there is no budget for the website. What is the most appropriate course of action?
  • Write to the original author of the article containing the image(s) and request formal written permission.
  • Write to PLoS Medicine and request formal written permission.
  • Write to the original author of the article containing the image(s) and PLoS Medicine to request formal written permission.
  • Use the image(s) on the website with appropriate citation(s).
  • Try to find similar images in other journals which allow reuse.

A student is creating a public newsletter for a medical charity and would like to include images from this paper. The work is voluntary and there is no budget for the newletter. What is the most appropriate course of action?
  • Use the images because this is for a medical charity.
  • Use the images because this journal has an Open Access policy.
  • Request permission for reuse via the publisher's website.
  • Give up because this journal will not allow reuse of images for this purpose.
  • Use the images because this is covered by Fair Use legislation.
  • Copy the images and change them slightly to avoid copyright.

A student is preparing for an assessed presentation on a module and would like to include an image from the BBC News website in it. Taking account the licence for images on the BBC News website, what is the most appropriate course of action?
  • Include the image in the presentation without a citation.
  • Include the image in their report with a citation to the original URL (web page).
  • Include the image in their report with a citation to the BBC News website homepage.
  • Try to locate a different image.
  • Don't include an image.
  • Draw the image using Microsoft PowerPoint.

A final year student is asked to publish their project report as a journal article in Current Cancer Studies, an Open Access journal. The project report includes a (properly cited) image of an unusual type of tumour cell from Wikipedia. What is the most appropriate course of action?
  • Include the image in the journal publication, and take no further action.
  • Contact the creator of the original image (cited as "NormanEinstein" on Wikipedia) to request permission, and do not publish the article unless permission has been obtained.
  • Include the image in the journal publication, and cite the original source.
  • Don't publish the paper.
  • Publish the paper without the image.